Archive for March, 1999

Undeserved Honors: Apparently I Have “Impact”…

Wednesday, March 24th, 1999

A couple of weeks ago I got an email from Kathy Schrock, the webmaster and namesake for the popular Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators website. In it she congratulated me and said it was nice to see our pictures on the same page. Unfortunately, I had no idea what she was talking about. It turns out that the edtech newspaper eSchoolNews had named me as a member of its first annual Impact 30 index, which profiles a list of the 30 most influential people in education technology today. It was surprising to see my name on the list, but perhaps more shocking was the fact that I was highlighted as one of five Newsmakers and Opinion Shapers, which also included Arizona senator/presidential candidate John McCain and Linda Roberts of the US Department of Education. I’m still not exactly sure what the folks at eSchoolNews were smoking when they made up their list, but nonetheless, I’m both touched and honored by their decision.

Conference Notes

Wednesday, March 24th, 1999

During the last week in February I attended the fourth annual Consortium for School Networking conference here in Washington. For the first time in a while I had the stressful distinction of presenting twice in less than 24 hours. On the first evening of the conference, I was a respondent for a dinner banquet debate on the question, “Should text books replaced by laptops?” Dr. Jack Christie of the Texas Board of Education (pro laptops) duked it out with edtech skeptic William Rukeyser (anti laptops, sort of). I took the position that the debate was based on the wrong question, and instead we should be asking, “In what context should laptops be used over textbooks.” I wasn’t booed or hissed at, so on the whole I felt pretty good about my three minutes of banquet rhetoric.The next day I presented a lunchtime speech on DTV and Education. The speech was essentially the same speech I gave at Tel-Ed in October, so if you’d like to read it, you can find it online.